How do I apply for a correction of my military record?

The first step is to get copies of all of your military records. To get a copy of your military records, complete the SF-180, Request Pertaining to Military Records, (Fillable SF 180). You can go to this link, type in the information while the form is on screen in your browser, and then print out a neatly typed form to be mailed! YOU WILL NEED TO HAVE ADOBE ACROBAT READER installed on your computer.http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html.

Once you have acquired a copy of your military records, you will need to fill out a DD Form 149, Application for Correction of Military Record (DD149), and submit it to the proper service. We recommend consulting with an attorney who is experienced in correction of military (or Naval) records prior to completing the form and submitting it.

William E. Cassara- Military Law Attorney

Recent Accomplishments

Marines

Navy and Marine Corps Court Finds That Military Judge Properly Granted Mistrial After Prosecutor Failed to Provide Discovery to Defense Counsel

By William Cassara | May 27, 2020

The Navy Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals recently decided the case of United States v. Cabrera. LCpl Cabrera was part of a group of Marines that went out to several bars one evening. LCpl Romeo (not her real name) was a member of the group and became intoxicated to […]

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CAAF

CAAF Finds that Defense Attorney Was Not Ineffective for Failing to Admit False Confession at Court-Martial

By William Cassara | May 14, 2020

The Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces (CAAF) recently decided the case of US v Carter. In 2015, Private First Class Gerald Carter was stationed at Fort Drum, New York but was temporarily assigned to Fort Polk, Louisiana. Both before and during the time that PFC Carter was in […]

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Supreme Court Decision Decides that Federal and State Jury Verdicts Must Be Unanimous

By William Cassara | April 30, 2020

Last week, the United States Supreme Court decided the case of Louisiana v. Ramos. Louisiana is one of two states (the other being Oregon) that do not require unanimous verdicts in criminal jury trials. In 2016, Evangelisto Ramos was found guilty of second degree murder by a jury that voted […]

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